Theological diversity and canonical authority: an examination of how diverse viewpoints in the Old Testament may be acknowledged, interrelated, and allowed to function theologically

Goldingay, John (1983) Theological diversity and canonical authority: an examination of how diverse viewpoints in the Old Testament may be acknowledged, interrelated, and allowed to function theologically. PhD thesis, University of Nottingham.

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Abstract

The OT manifests considerable theological diversity. But if it is in some sense 'one' book, its diverse viewpoints should be capable of being brought into a coherent mutual relationship.

One approach sets the OT's varied viewpoints against the background of their varied contexts. It is necessary to go on, however, to ask whether certain contexts allow individual theological themes to emerge more clearly or more profoundly than others. Examples are considered.

The theme of the people of God in the OT is considered at greater length. What it means to be the people of God varies in different periods, but the eras of the theocratic nation and of the afflicted remnant allow the deepest insights to emerge.

A second approach is to see some theological perspectives as preferable to others. If we are to continue affirming the scriptural status of the whole OT, it is necessary to make clear that such a judgment evaluates the relative worth of different viewpoints rather than totally rejecting some.

The varied levels of material in Deuteronomy illustrate the point Its behavioural values and its theological perspective are accompanied by a pastoral strategy which -starts where people are as sinners and where they are in their cultural context.

A third approach seeks to formulate one OT theology by constructing a new whole in which all the diverse material can find its own place. Examples are considered.

The tension between creation (order, cosmos) and salvation (history) is considered at greater length. The OT material as a whole suggests that the world God redeems is the world of God’s creation; the world God created is one that needed to be redeemed; man is redeemed to live again his created life before God; redeemed humanity still looks for a final act of redemption/re-creation.

Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Supervisors:McKeating, H.
Uncontrolled Keywords:Theology, Old Testament, Authority
Faculties/Schools:UK Campuses > Faculty of Arts > School of Humanities
ID Code:937
Deposited By:Janet Wharton
Deposited On:08 Oct 2009 15:09
Last Modified:27 Oct 2009 10:41

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