British Conservative women MPs and 'women's issues' 1950-1979

Haessly, Katie (2010) British Conservative women MPs and 'women's issues' 1950-1979. PhD thesis, University of Nottingham.

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Abstract

In the period 1950-1979, there were significant changes in legislation relating to women’s issues, specifically employment, marital and guardianship and abortion rights. This thesis explores the impact of Conservative female MPs on these changes as well as the changing roles of women within the party. In addition there is a discussion of the relationships between Conservative women and their colleagues which provides insights into the changes in gender roles which were occurring at this time.

Following the introduction the next four chapters focus on the women themselves and the changes in the above mentioned women’s issues during the mid-twentieth century and the impact Conservative women MPs had on them. The changing Conservative attitudes are considered in the context of the wider changes in women’s roles in society in the period.

Chapter six explores the relationship between women and men of the Conservative Parliamentary Party, as well as men’s impact on the selected women’s issues. These relationships were crucial to enhancing women’s roles within the party, as it is widely recognised that women would not have been able to attain high positions or affect the issues as they did without help from male colleagues.

Finally, the female Labour MPs in the alteration of women’s issues is discussed in Chapter seven. Labour women’s relationships both with their party and with Conservative women are also examined.

This thesis concludes by linking Conservative female MPs’ impact upon women’s issues, their relationships both within and outside of their party, and the effect these had on the ability of women to fully participate in Parliament. In bringing these together, it will be shown that the impact Conservative female MPs had on the various pieces of legislation was of importance and that these women’s hard work allowed them to gain more recognition within the party and society.

Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Supervisors:Wrigley, C.J.
Harvey, E.
Faculties/Schools:UK Campuses > Faculty of Arts > School of History
ID Code:1513
Deposited By:Dr Katie Haessly
Deposited On:24 Feb 2011 09:48
Last Modified:24 Feb 2011 09:48

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